Wednesday, 2 July 2014

The Queen's Brownie!

The Queen's Camera for The King's Ginger

I'm quite excited about this month's King's Ginger blog post. It's the first time I have actually acquired a piece of genuine Edwardian royalty memorabilia. But, thanks to the lackadaisical UK postal system, the post has come a little late as I couldn't publish it without having said item in my sweaty mitts! But here it is, a new adventure into the life of King Edward VII - this time I'm talking about his good lady wife, Queen Alexandra, a most unexpected pioneer of early photography! Time to get snap happy!


The Queen's Camera for The King's Ginger

The Queen's Camera for The King's Ginger

Something which has mysteriously never come up in the couple of years that I've been doing these posts is the fact that Queen Alexandra was seriously into her photography. She was absolutely devoted to her hobby, and was the lucky owner of a Kodak No. 1, one of the first cameras ever made by American company Kodak in 1889. It was lucky she was the Princess of Wales as those little magic boxes were really quite expensive back then. An American company, they cost $25 (around $600 now) in 1889 but came pre-loaded with 100 shots - you finished the roll and then sent the whole thing back to the company to be processed and reloaded. 

The first camera they ever made was simply called the Kodak, followed by the Kodak No. 1, and it even had its first ever promotional model, or Kodak Girl, Kitty Kramer, in 1890.



But actually, Princess Alexandra pre-dated Kitty by several years. Here she is with her camera in 1889!


Apparently, Kodak founder George Eastman had opened a London shop selling his film products in 1885 but by 1891 they had also opened their first manufacturing plant outside of the US, in Harrow. Alexandra seemed committed to one brand (not that there were many around back then) at least throughout the pertinent period. In an unprecedented move for a Royal, she exhibited her work in public in the Kodak exhibitions of 1902 and 1906 and in 1908, she published a book, the aforementioned rather fabulous piece of memorabilia that I tracked down on Mssrs E. Bay & Co.

The Queen's Brownie!

The Queen's Brownie!

The Queen's Brownie!

From Glucksberg:
It contained reproductions of 136 snapshots, ninety printed in photogravure and forty-six mounted by hand on to dark green pages, to look like a real photograph album. The book, sold at 2s 6d (12 ½ p) a copy, was published simultaneously in England and America on 12 November 1908. Large orders were also dispatched to Russia, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Germany, France and throughout the British Empire. The book had an incredible success and over thirty charities ultimately benefited from sales, giving the Queen the greatest satisfaction.
My copy also benefited a charity as I purchased it from the eBay shop of Children's Hospice South West, which I am really pleased about. But it looks originally that it was given as a birthday present in January the following year by someone's dear Granny (not in July as is crossed out... she must have been cross with herself for that)!

The Queen's Brownie!


The book itself is filled with snapshots of family life and the duties of a Queen as well. Numerous snaps of the King, their children and grandchildren appear:

The Queen's Brownie!

The Queen's Brownie!

The Empress of Russia was Queen Victoria's granddaughter, so Alexandra's neice: 

The Queen's Brownie!

The Queen's Brownie!

I thought by 'sister' she meant 'sister-in-law' as Victoria, Empress of Prussia was actually Edward's sister, but she died in 1901... so what I'm saying is, I don't know.

The Queen's Brownie!


Of course there are tons of other brilliant photos in there. Have a look at the earlier-linked Glucksberg and this post by Madam Guillotine to see a few more.

The Queen was so proud of her efforts that she even had her photographs printed onto a tea set in circa 1900!



I guess it's the 1900s equivalent of getting a mug of your own mug from Moonpig (dot commm!)? But distinctly classier.

There can be no doubt that the public support and enthusiasm that Queen Alexandra showed for photography helped make the hobby more popular for the masses. The Royal Family were the super celebrities of their day, after all! And although that first 1880s camera was out of reach of most people's pockets, Kodak introduced the Brownie in 1900. It cost only 5D or $1 and remains the most famous Kodak ever.





I wanted to have a look at an original Kodak camera myself, but the best I could track down was a Brownie in the V&A Museum of Childhood. It's from much later - 1950-1960, but the design didn't change all that much in the 50 years, it just got a bit smaller!

The Queen's Camera for The King's Ginger

The Queen's Camera for The King's Ginger

Now as that was the only old Kodak I could track down, there was little chance of me finding one to pose with. So I had to do with a very anachronistic little camera, but one that looks lovely in its own photographs - a 1950s Rolleiflex lent to me by my pal and vintage photographer extraordinaire, Hanson Leatherby

The Queen's Camera for The King's Ginger
This one taken by me! 

The Queen's Camera for The King's Ginger

The Queen's Camera for The King's Ginger
With a special guest/hand appearance by Jeni Yesterday

The Queen's Camera for The King's Ginger

The only problem with these early cameras is... it's impossible to take a selfie! ;)The Queen's Camera for The King's Ginger

I'll leave you with one thing, the most suitable recipe for the season. Enjoy one and all - I will be posting a special extra blog on behalf of the King's Ginger sooner than usual - from the Hampton Court Flower Show no less!



Fleur xx
DiaryofaVintageGirl.com

25 comments:

  1. Alexandra Marie2 July 2014 at 18:58

    Old cameras!!! I like the selfie attempt ;) Alex

    http://tobebeautifulingodseyes.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  2. I believe my grandfather has a Brownie camera in the garage somewhere. Rather to say, I HOPE he does. I saw some this weekend when I was at a flea market, and wanted to snag one, but I refrained.
    Thank you for this lovely bit of Kodak history!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wow! What a cool post! I had no idea that Queen Alexandra was such a keen photographer.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Awww....you are adorable my dear! Love that you are doing a selfie with that camera!
    May xx
    www.walkinginmay.com

    ReplyDelete
  5. Alexandra was apparently a good at photography, no? By the looks of it, she had it going. Who knows: what would it be is she was around nowadays, would she be an amateur photograper (or would she be a selfie-girl?) :)


    Marija

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  8. Interesting post! I think "my sister the Empress" can be Maria Feodorovna of Russia, or Dagmar of Denmark, as she was from the beginning.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Beautiful, engaging post. This tickled my fancy on so many levels - especially as a vintage lover, photographer, and history buff. Interestingly, despite all those things, I don't currently own any vintage cameras (hard to believe, I know!). That's something I really should remedy one of these days!

    ♥ Jessica

    ReplyDelete
  10. ADISHER Leather5 July 2014 at 14:39

    Lovely pictures :)

    envy with the old & vintage camera anyway...so gorgeous!!

    http://adisherleather.blogspot.com/ - ADISHER Leather

    ReplyDelete
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